How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto book. Happy reading How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto Pocket Guide.

Refresh your browser page to run scripts and reload content. Click the Internet Zone.


  1. Grants & Loans for Students, Businesses & Non-Profits.
  2. On the Origin of Species, 6th Edition.
  3. ADVERTISEMENT?
  4. Eric Asimov: How to Love Wine.
  5. A Letter From Grandpa.
  6. The Birth of Saudi Arabia: Britain and the Rise of the House of Saud!
  7. Far North Queensland 1986;

If you do not have to customize your Internet security settings, click Default Level. Then go to step 5. Click OK to close the Internet Options popup. Chrome On the Control button top right of browser , select Settings from dropdown. Under the header JavaScript select the following radio button: Allow all sites to run JavaScript recommended. Prices and offers may vary in store. About The Author. Eric Asimov is the chief wine critic of theNew York Times, where his weekly column appears in the Dining section.

Asimov has a clear position on wine: "Ignore ratings, laugh at tasting notes, drink wine and enjoy it! And search out interesting wines".

How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto - Eric Asimov - Google книги

But it is hard to make those precepts last a whole book. I think if the book had simply been a memoir of his life in journalism and with wine, with a chapter on his view of enjoying wine, I would have loved the book. As is, I hit the halfway point and was tired of him lecturing me on the same points over and over again. Sep 24, Heather rated it it was ok Shelves: social-issues. I wavered between two and three stars, but ultimately the combination of its repetitiveness and my disappointment to come out much the wiser about wine convinced me to rate it lower.

The "memoir" parts of the book are reasonably interesting, and they are also the better parts, I believe. Despite dust jacket promises, the "manifesto" parts are not particularly revelatory. Asimov's main points could have made a nice newspaper column, but as a book they are tedious and end up in cul-de-sacs of I wavered between two and three stars, but ultimately the combination of its repetitiveness and my disappointment to come out much the wiser about wine convinced me to rate it lower.

Asimov's main points could have made a nice newspaper column, but as a book they are tedious and end up in cul-de-sacs of name dropping that are no help at all to those uninitiated into the wine lovers' club.

Some of his points are reassuring to those drooling idiots of us who know nothing about wine except that there is red and white and it is nice to have a glass sometimes. For instance, he strongly believes that wine should be enjoyed, not studied, and specifically enjoyed with good food and good friends.

No objections from me! He also makes the case that no wine tasting class or connoisseur's magazine is really helpful in learning to love wine. You just need to try lots of different things and take notes about what you enjoy. Well, I can swallow that, but one starts to get antsy about the price tag involved in "how to love wine. Of course, Asimov is fine with you enjoying whatever makes you happy, even if it's cheap wine, but who needs a whole book to tell you that you should enjoy whatever wine makes you happy?

It's rather like the cheat of Dorothy finding out that she traveled all the way to the Emerald City only to find out that she had the power to take herself home all along. In summary: This is not the best book for you if. As the subtitle says, it is both a memoir and a manifesto. The memoir part is fairly straightforward, but the manifesto is a bit harder to pin down.

It is easier to say what Asimov is against than in what he espouses. Generally, he is against scores, tasting notes, and blind tastings - more Hugh Johnson than Robert Parker Jr. In this, I agree. Critics tend to taste-and-spit a vast number of wines at once, which gives little idea of how a wine evolves through drinking a bottle, or the context of As the subtitle says, it is both a memoir and a manifesto.

Critics tend to taste-and-spit a vast number of wines at once, which gives little idea of how a wine evolves through drinking a bottle, or the context of where and with whom you drink it. Scores also put one at the mercy of the particular reviewer's predilections, "Parkerization" OK, if your taste matches a particular critic's , which also leads to producers vying to match that style, rather than express their own, on a global scale. Wine is, after all, a business as well as a craft. Wine notes are another goofy thing. As Asimov shows, three different critics derived three different lists of characteristics from the same wine, and who the hell knows what some of the supposed items they pull from the bouquet and taste are?

Fig paste? Maduro tobacco?? Asimov champions the small, independent producer, Old World or New, but who actually produces good stuff there is a lot of bad wine out there. And that one should enjoy wine as one does, not to over-intellectualize it. Jun 18, Ashley rated it did not like it Shelves: memoir , books , non-fiction , food-issues. I really wanted to like this one - a memoir and manifesto on wine, what else could you want? But it was light on the memoir piece and repetitive on the wine part.

Asimov's position on wine is that it shouldn't be an anxiety-inducing thing. Wine is pleasurable and the wine critics who focus on tasting notes, flowery descriptive language, and emphasis on rare and expensive vintages only serves to push the accessibility of wine farther away from the general consumer. Over and over and over again. He did have some interesting nuggets about boutique wineries and such that was interesting, but overall this book didn't hold my interest very well. Feb 21, Mikhail Lutchman rated it really liked it.

I enjoyed this little peek into the world of wine. The author's passion really shines through and is refreshing for the average wine lover. His writing style is simple, honest and down to earth. I'd love to share a bottle with him, if I would be so lucky.

The book does get a bit repetitive and abtruse at points but I really appreciate the small stories behind each grape and bottle and vintage.

KIRKUS REVIEW

I wish there might have been more on his journey as he first fell in love with wine and carried it thro I enjoyed this little peek into the world of wine. I wish there might have been more on his journey as he first fell in love with wine and carried it through his career. I'm not sure if it deserves as much as 4 stars but the book had me so excited to try new wines and truly appreciate their story, and you can't put a rating on that.

There is definitely some rambling chapters and repetition of his mantras here but also some rather deep insights into how to really think about how to explore wine personally by forgetting about all the ratings and florid tasting notes. Good ideas on exploring new wines. Apr 23, Kyle rated it really liked it. Eric writes a great book that both goes into how he became the chief wine critic for NYTs as well as discusses how to make you more comfortable exploring wines and developing your own tastes in an uncondecending manner.

Sep 27, Suzanne rated it really liked it. Interesting and fun. Read definitely agreed with his attitude toward wine May 26, Peter Wassam rated it it was ok. Usually his writing is more engaging than this. Feels defensive when there's no need to be. Would be better served almost strictly as a memoir. Jul 02, Frances rated it liked it Shelves: obtained-new , , non-fiction , nf-wine , format-paper. I have always enjoyed Asimov's columns in the Times, and this book made me like him even more.

Sep 28, Thomas Ryan rated it really liked it. A very level headed, just the facts POV on wine. Apr 13, Audrey rated it really liked it. This book is perfect for the person who's just started drinking wine or wants to start drinking wine more seriously.

Account Options

It is for the new-comers who want to be told the water's fine before they make the jump. It is for the person who feels hopelessly lost in the wine world. He is a warm and welcoming ambassador to the wine world and he clearly hopes everyone has the chance to at least visit and then perhaps stay for another drink or two.

The chapter "The Home Wine School" is a lovely chapter that g This book is perfect for the person who's just started drinking wine or wants to start drinking wine more seriously. The chapter "The Home Wine School" is a lovely chapter that gives practical advice on how to make the wine experience your own. Eric Asimov is an endearing writer.

Humble, casual, passionate, and very romantic. His path to a life of drinking and writing about wine is very much his own. There is life and gratitude in his voice when he writes of the memorable wines and conversations with people. When reading these chapters, it's very easy to smile the way one does upon seeing a child discover something small but awesome. One thing about this book that bothered me was that Asimov repeatedly tells the readers how he particularly enjoys to drink his wine, that wine scores and tasting notes are work against the inherent pleasure in drinking wine, but lastly this is the one that drove me nuts that everyone can have their own opinion.

He was, in a nutshell, too apologetic for my tastes. The repetition of the above was so finely threaded throughout the book that it wasn't simply a matter of skipping a few pages and not bothering to read what I don't care to read. The motif, I suppose. I would rather that he state succinctly how his views differ from others' and then go a little deeper. More concise. Maybe a little more straightforward. This book could have been tighter.

Jun 29, Scott rated it did not like it. As many other people have noted, there is nothing new in this book. While I am sure some readers are giddy with delight with Asimov's cute examples regarding even the professional tasters inability to agree on what a wine smells like, but in all seriousness, he could have picked some other wines where you will get a near consensus as to what the wine in your glass smells like.

But that wouldn't be nearly as interesting, would it? Asimov also refers to Riesling Kabinett wines as being "slightly swe As many other people have noted, there is nothing new in this book.

How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto

Asimov also refers to Riesling Kabinett wines as being "slightly sweet" pg , kindle. I think this is quite misleading especially the type of readers he seems to be targeting as Kabinett wines are often completely dry and are probably more known for being dry than sweet off-dry is probably better. He also suggests that "few people, even with years of experience" would be able to tell "the difference between a Pomerol and a Pommard. Jun 13, Maron rated it liked it. I really wanted to rate this book more stars, but it just didn't give me a whole lot.

Eric Asimov - How to Love Wine

I enjoyed Asimov's writing style - it was very personal and approachable, which is exactly how he presents the world of wine throughout the book. There was no preaching or layers of information to read through, instead the main story line is about his own path of becoming a wine lover, which I enjoyed. He evaluates the current wine culture, discussing trends both interesting and alarming, and celebrates the extraordinary pleasures of wine while, at the same time, questioning the conventional wisdom about wine.

Many wine-lovers wonder, as they are poured wine to taste from the bottle they have just ordered, what exactly they are supposed to do. To love it is a A wine expert who finds fault with tasting notes, wine scores and blind tasting claims that "what's missing in many people's experience of wine is a simple sense of ease. Eric Asimov is the chief wine critic of the New York Times, where his weekly column appears in the Dining section.

Eric Asimov.



admin